Cementery Adventures Austin Memorial layout Austin Salado Edom Liberty Hill  
See cementery
Image viewer
Austin
 
Liberty Hill
 
Salado
 
Van Zandt County
 
Mouse over and click on Cemetery for details.  
     
Austin
  The recorded history of Austin, Texas, began in the 1830s when Anglo-American settlers arrived in Central Texas. In 1837 settlers founded the village of Waterloo on the banks of the Colorado River, the first permanent settlement in the area. By 1839, Waterloo would adopt the name Austin and become the capital of the Republic of Texas. Following Mexico's Independence from Spain, Anglo-American settlers began to populate Texas and reached present-day Central Texas by the 1830s. The first documented permanent settlement in the area dates to 1837 when the village of Waterloo near the confluence of the Colorado River and and Shoal Creek.  
     
Salado
  Salado is rich in history, character and legend. The community grew up around a flowing spring fed creek that provided a welcome oasis for early Central Texas visitors. But long before Salado attracted permanent settlers, the area drew Native American Indians as well as Spanish and Mexican travelers who were drawn to its peaceful beauty. Legend has it these various visitors believed Salado Creek possessed 'special curative powers'. The sculpture "Sirena" is a tribute to the creek's spiritual tradition. Originally an Overland Stage and Pony Express Stop on the Old Chisholm Trail, Salado welcomed such Texas history luminaries as General Robert E. Lee, General George Custer, and Sam Houston.  
     
Van Zandt County
  During the Civil War and the period of Reconstruction, Canton was little more than a hole in the road. Following the end of the Civil War, the small towns in Van Zandt County were overrun with Federal Troops and carpetbaggers all in the name of reconstruction. The Van Zandt citizens became “fed up” with all of these troops and carpetbaggers and formed a committee of citizens to approach the County Commissioners, informing them that they wanted Van Zandt County to secede from the United States and also from the State of Texas! It passed and Van Zandt County became the Free State of Van Zandt, totally separated from the United States and the State of Texas.  
     
Liberty Hill
  Liberty Hill Cemetery - Weathered gravestones show usage of this spot for burials since 1852, when the earliest settlers were establishing homes in area. The first formal grant of land here as a community burial ground was made by John T. and Amelia Edwards Bryson in 1875, when three and one-half acres were deeded to the Liberty Hill cemetery trustees: T. N. Bryson, C. C. Chance, W. H. Poole, J. B. Roddy, and T. S. Snyder. This acreage was protected by a stone fence built with their own hands by the Brysons and their neighbors. The Liberty Hill Cemetery is the final resting place for a large number of people that helped build the Liberty Hill area of Central Texas into a great place to live